Trading for Rondo Was All About Asset Management

Now that the Rajon Rondo trade that sent Brandan Wright, Jae Crowder and a pick to the Boston Celtics has officially been ruled an abject failure, it’s important that we back up and remind ourselves the complete thought process behind bringing Rondo in.

Now that the Rajon Rondo trade that sent Brandan Wright, Jae Crowder and a pick to the Boston Celtics has officially been ruled an abject failure, it’s important that we back up and remind ourselves the complete thought process behind bringing Rondo in.

Like many fans, I hated to see Brandan Wright go, but understood why the Mavs made the deal. Wright was in the last year of his contract, so his future beyond this year was already uncertain. Mavs were aware that even by giving up Wright via trade he could ultimately decide to return to the Mavs this summer and a source has indicated to me that Wright is open to the idea.

The Mavs trade for Rondo was just as much about ‘fit and talent’ as it was about smart ‘asset management’ by Mark Cuban. When the Mavs traded for Rondo they also acquired his Bird rights.

Thus, it gave them the ability to go over the cap this summer while signing him to a long term deal.

In the event he were (and will) choose the to leave, he can be package for another ‘max player’ via sign-and-trade ie. for Goran Dragic, etc., while going over the salary cap.

Tricky part would be that he and the trading team would have to be willing to help the Mavs out in return as a ‘nice professional gesture’ to ensure the team that losses him gets something in return, as Lebron did when he left the Heat.

As we’ve now learned, Rondo doesn’t appear to fall in the ‘nice professional gesture’ category. Nevertheless, that’s the risk you take when you acquire for a player that talented who may help you now and/or provide you additional financial opportunities  down the road.

How Rondo’s tenure in Dallas finishes out in the final days is anyone’s guess, but you can definitely consider this the farewell tour.

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